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Posts Tagged ‘change management’

Our cohorts at Panorama Consulting often write good pieces about the importance of business process change management, especially when it relates to firms in growth mode who also happen to be implementing success strategies and software systems aimed at supporting that growth.

Recently they penned a piece on the topic of what you can learn from your business process management mistakes.  Because we also spend our days reviewing firms’ business processes, we thought their words worth sharing with our audience.  You’ll find their original piece here.

 

Just as researchers search furiously for the cause of disasters involving ships and planes, they suggest we too search for causes behind operational disruptions, which often cause morale problems among employees, inadequate software implementations and customizations, frustration all around, and low benefit realization.

To learn from our failures, the authors suggest we

  • Forgive – “Take a deep breath, forgive ourselves and others” to gain a clear head.
  • Analyze – Conduct a “lessons learned meeting to review project deliverables. Quantifying the direct and indirect costs in terms of time and money will give you an idea of the benefits you’ll need to realize to achieve a positive ROI on failure.”
  • Disseminate – Share lessons learned across the organization.

Panorama notes that “operational disruptions can be avoided by developing an effective business process management plan.”  They suggest including…

  • Business Process Mapping. We wholeheartedly concur, because any successful implementation always starts here.  At a high level, we map current processes and future-state processes, looking for technology touch points, redundancies (and ways to eliminate them), and how to do away with multiple and sometimes proprietary silos of information.  You reengineer your processes in order to optimize your workflows, both human and machine, to best capture the talents of your organization and the areas where you lend the most value to your customers.
  • Organization Change Management. Implementing new business solutions can often result in a decrease in productivity initially.  As the authors note: “Business process management cannot succeed without customized training and targeted employee communication, both of which should begin before software selection.”
  • Continuous Improvement. It’s a mentality.  And it will help ensure that you maintain optimized processes consistently into the future.  Set KPIs and other benchmarks which allow you to record progress and build toward improved performance.  Measure regularly.  If you can’t measure it, you can’t improve it.

Good advice all to anyone implementing process change, organizational change, or structural changes from software to process management.

 

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apics changeA recent article by Brian Dominguez, CPIM, a change consultant and General Manager at MDMOTO Group, in the Jan/Feb 2016 issue of APICS Magazine reminds us of just how hard change can be.  As John Kotter noted twenty years ago in the Harvard Business Review, 70 percent of change attempts fail outright.  Studies point to human resistance and company culture as key reasons.

Software implementation projects are a great example, and with their very dynamic designs, it’s no surprise that the Standish Group’s 2014 “Chaos Report” found that only one in six such projects finish on time and on budget, and that only one in eleven large businesses reach their implementation targets.

As Dominguez points out in his article, “Clearly change is difficult [and]… does not occur without conscientious planning and support from the top down.”  Too often, he notes, change projects are driven by quantitative, empirical and rational approaches to a problem – when in fact those methods “fail to take into account that change is driven by a qualitative environment and may require a different technique to gain buy-in.”

Kotter therefore advises business leaders to follow 8 guidelines that he says are essential for fostering change:

  1. Create a sense of urgency
  2. Establish a powerful guiding coalition
  3. Create a vision
  4. Communicate a vision
  5. Empower others to act on the vision
  6. Plan for and create short-term wins
  7. Consolidate improvements and produce still more change
  8. Institutionalize the new approach.

There’s a lot more to the article than that (like how small wins are important because they reduce anxiety and resistance to change while building a sense of self control), but as you can see, if the emphasis is not on the human elements of the change at hand, and the careful communication and handling of those elements, then the chance for failure is pretty high.

It’s worth five minutes of every manager’s time to review Kotter’s 8 points, and keep the human side of change foremost in one’s mind for any change initiative you may be contemplating.  And that most assuredly includes software implementations.

(APICS Magazine can be found here.)

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