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Posts Tagged ‘Dynamics NAV’

A good post by a west coast NAV blogger provides steps for integrating your Dynamics NAV (in this case, 2018, though it should work basically the same for other versions) with Microsoft’s Excel spreadsheet.  The end result is a new, separate “Dynamics NAV” tab in the ribbon of your Excel application that links directly to NAV.

[Disclaimer: While some users may be able to handle this one on their own, feel free to contact us or your authorized NAV partner to installation assistance if it will make you feel safer.  Also note that this is specifically for NAV (in particular, though not exclusively, the 2018 version), and presumably not for the new Business Central.]

Step 1: Locate your installation file (that’s your NAV ‘setup’ file). The file location may vary depending on how and where your NAV is installed (you might be able to get help from your IT folks, or call us).

Step2:  Double-click the file name (setup.exe) and when asked “Do you want to allow this app to make changes to your device?” click the “Yes” box.

Step 3: From the Maintenance setup wizard, click “Add or remove components” which will open a box listing a lot of application parts under the heading “Customize the Installation.”

Step 4: From the listing, click the down arrow in the little box associated with “Microsoft Excel Add-In.”

Step 5: When the little down-arrow box opens, click “Run from my computer” and then click “Next.”

Step 6: You will see a screen of specified parameters and, assuming these are correct, click “Apply.”

Step 7: NAV will then run the function to enable the add-in and you should see a Microsoft Dynamics NAV information screen that says: “The modification of Microsoft Dynamics NAV has completed successfully.”

 

Again, while it’s pretty simple, we always suggest you have a knowledgeable NAV/tech support person available to you whenever making changes to your system.  Assuming all goes well, you’ll end up with a Dynamics NAV tab in the ribbon of your Excel for fast NAV access!

Our thanks to Encore Business blogger Eunice Gan who posted this tip/article, with screen shots here, originally.

 

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In a recent report compilation the editors at Panorama Consulting Solutions listed what they considered to be four of the top manufacturing software solutions, as well as their prescription for the “ideal” manufacturing software system, from among the now over 200 solutions from which companies today have to choose.  Those top four included SAP, Oracle, Infor and Microsoft Dynamics.

Of the Dynamics 365 solution, Panorama writes…

Microsoft Dynamics solutions have a familiar user interface and suit organizations of all sizes. Microsoft Dynamics D365 Enterprise enables data and resource integration across various departments and locations. The solution has been redeveloped as a pure SaaS model, but also can be deployed on-premise or hosted in the cloud. In terms of field service functionality, Microsoft Dynamics employs IoT technology to improve response times and operational efficiency.

This October, Dynamics 365 for Sales will be enabled with artificial intelligence, which will give manufacturers better visibility into their supply chain. Dynamics D365 continues its reliance on a partner ecosystem to develop niche functionality. Partners are currently in the process of understanding niche IP development for the new version of Microsoft Dynamics.

As to that “ideal” manufacturing system?  Here’s some sage advice:

The ideal manufacturing solution should address the entire supply chain, from product inception to customer delivery. It should have functionality to track suppliers, materials, production costs, maintenance and customer relationships. Ultimately, it should increase operational efficiency and provide full visibility into manufacturing processes and business data. Transforming your manufacturing organization requires technology that drives efficiency and enables full supply chain visibility.

While it’s helpful to compare the strengths of various ERP systems, the best solution for your business depends on your unique needs and situation.

To their advice we would add:

Discuss your needs with a software reselling partner or consultant who knows the territory, one who specializes in the manufacturing sector, and is aware of the many nuances of production, scheduling, bills of material and the unique inventory requirements that attend to them.  Find a good consultant, determine whether you’re comfortable with their people and if they have a methodology for getting you to where you want to go.  Then, when you think you’re ready, talk to a couple of their references, make sure you are on the same page with respect to your unique project roadmap, and be willing to provide the full range of resources and staff commitment required to get the job done.

After all, you only want to do this once.

(You can find access to the full report beginning here.)

 

 

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Today we’re sharing a few behind-the-scenes details about the latest incarnation of Microsoft Dynamics NAV as it continues its evolution into the cloud-first product now called Dynamics 365 Business Central.

Our comments come from various NAV blogs, with a special tip of the hat to long-time Italian NAV developer Roberto Stefanetti.

To begin with, as a cloud-first product, expect to see even more frequent updates to Business Central than we saw under NAV, which used to be updated about every 18 months, and then more recently, annually.  There is becoming a lot more documentation available to resellers including courses and videos, with more expected.  A BC-dedicated forum has recently come online.

Because the BC product is cloud-first by design, Microsoft will always be updating that product first, with upgrades to server-based (or in-house based) systems afterwards.  Using a cloud version of an ERP product means in effect that you are always up to date.

The new development environment, “born first to Business Central” states Stefanetti, allows us to create ‘extensions’ which can then be ‘certified’ (or not), which allows for customization of the core product in what some call a “less invasive” fashion (i.e., less labor-intensive for upgrades later) than in the past.

Business Central will now be able to offer native (i.e., cloud-integrated) services for Outlook, Office 365, Microsoft CRM, Power BI and Flow, to name a few.  Users will now be able to grow into a ‘virtual desk’ in the cloud – and with your ERP system now there, you’ll never have to leave the cloud.

For its ‘public’ cloud of course Microsoft will feature Azure, which has now become the second most popular public cloud platform in the world (behind Amazon Web Services).  Azure offers a public cloud hosted experience that features a multi-tenant database (many customers running off the same database), an architecture based on events, extensions for customization development, and an App store as a source for distributing apps to others.

From a cost standpoint, you’ll be paying by the user/month, so you’re only paying for the ‘amount’ of software you truly need, and there will be several types of users, at different price points.  Think of it very much like a car lease – you pay a fixed rate every month based on user counts and types, and your system is always kept up to date.  One price, generally speaking, can be made to cover the application, all hosting for users, maintenance/upgrades, and probably even additional services (like Office, etc.).  That’s a conversation you have with your Business Central business partner (i.e., reseller).  It’s a strong move into today’s new billing model: subscription pricing, and we’re seeing it everywhere, not just in software.

Given the benefits noted above, and since we haven’t had a chance to test all the limitations in the new model, we’ll quote verbatim what consultant Stefanetti has to say on the subject.  It’s important to note that his comments on limitations are specific to the Microsoft Azure public-cloud hosting option.  Partners (like us) are able to offer OTHER non-Azure options that avoid some of the stated limitations.  Nonetheless, of the Azure/public approach, Stefanetti notes as follows:

The system is closed (but secure). You can’t access SQL Server and databases. Only the environment-specific tenant that you have purchased exists. You can’t create development environments, only sandboxes in the same tenant for the purpose of testing the data. Therefore, the modality of the approach is very different from the on-premises world.

It is not possible to back up the database because we do not access SQL Server. The system does not go down but it is possible to restore data if necessary. The backup is managed by Microsoft, with no way to schedule an auto-backup. Therefore, a backup cannot be launched by the end user, but if necessary, it is possible to open an issue to Microsoft and they can provide a restore.

You can use RapidStart Services Packages to export data, but that isn’t a real backup system (you can’t restore your database after a crash failure) like an on-premises system. Rather, this tool allows you can export for example the “setup data” for master tables, and secondary tables (a copy of setup).

Sorry, that’s all the space (and then some) we have today, but we’ll continue to cover more Business Central update details in the future, just as we’ve been doing.  Stay tuned.

 

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Every NAV client we know (and every NON-NAV client too, for that matter) eventually confronts the need to adjust their costs.  A recent blog post by Alex Chow, of AP Commerce, a California (and Taiwan)-based NAV consultant provides a quick tip that NAV users should know.  While his advice won’t solve all costing issues, it provides an important foundation.

Chow points out that users occasionally need to use NAV’s “Adjust Cost-Item Entries” feature.  The problem is, when you do this, NAV also adjusts the entry date of that item, often causing an unwanted back-dating issue in a previous accounting period.

The reason, Chows notes, is that the adjust cost process will always adjust to the date of the original sales transaction (unless specified otherwise)

For example, if you haven’t run Adjust Cost in a while, and you then run it say in June, and there was a sale transaction in, say, March that has not been adjusted yet, the resulting entry will date itself to that of the June entry.  That’s a problem if you’ve already closed the books on March, as is likely.

However, as Chow points out, “this is where the Allow Posting From field from the General Ledger Setup screen comes to the rescue.”  If you set the “Allow Posting From” field on the General Ledger Setup to a different date (say for our example, June 1), any adjusted entries that are BEFORE the Allow Posting From date will have same posting date as the Allow Posting From field entry.

In our example above, it’s 6/30/18 and you run the adjust cost process. In addition, you set the Allow Posting From to 6/1/18. If there was a sales transaction that occurred on 3/15/18 that has not been adjusted yet, the resulting adjusting entry will be posted on 6/1/18.

Setting the Allow Posting From should be done after you close the month out, NOT before, notes Chow, adding that “I’ve seen situations where the user changed the Allow Posting From BEFORE the adjust cost was ran.  So all of the adjusting entries were posted in the current period instead of the period that they should’ve been in.”

The more you know…

 

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(This is the second of our two posts reflecting the thoughts of noted NAV blogger Eric Wauters on the upcoming release of the new Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2018.  His full, original post can be found here.)

 

Fact 8: Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2018 will be released on December 1st.  Thanks to the Directions conference in Orlando last month, and the feedback and the passion of the partners, this had to happen.  As Microsoft has already announced, the product itself is ready.  It’s the pricing and positioning issues they are working on that have delayed the release.

Fact 9: Extension V2 will work on Dynamics NAV 2018.  In non-Geek-speak this simply means that a very modern development experience in VSCode will work on the December release, and that we will be able to create extensions on top of our own customizations and products as well.

Fact 10: Yes, you will be able to white label your product, but you don’t have to.  “Powered by Microsoft Dynamics 365” or not, it’s your choice.  (Early word last month was that Microsoft would change the marketing thrust from promoting “NAV” to promoting a “Powered by…” approach, thus allowing resellers and ISVs the ability to “white label” their accouring offerings.  But really… I mean, really?  Would you rather by “Brian’s Accounting & Manufacturing Powered by Microsoft Dynamics” or simply Microsoft Dynamics NAV, as you always have?  No brainer.

Fact 11: Microsoft is working on the pricing.  Considering the various options… on-premise… cloud… as discrete functional-areas apps (like CRM or Marketing) and not just the “ful-blown” complete ERP system… Microsoft has a lot to think about.  But it’s coming.

Fact 12: There is no monetization in AppSource – but it will come.  This one is mostly for partners.  It means that we’ll be able to sell customized apps through the Microsoft App Store, and there will be a ‘monetization’ policy at some point.  In other words, Microsoft will likely have an approval process for apps and then make them available on the store and take their cut.  Think of Apple’s app store model.

Fact 13: Microsoft Dynamics NAV consumes an insane amount of Azure stuff – and that’s a good thing.  Cloud based NAV can generate a lot of data and metrics on its Azure cloud, and that stuff will eventually be available as analytics of some kind or another.  It’s a work in progress for now.

A new development environment… new features… the ability to run either in the cloud or at your own site… the ability to create apps… the enhanced capabilities to run with the Microsoft “stack” of applications from Windows to Office 365 (Word, Excel, etc.) to Outlook… Dynamics NAV will be at the heart of it all.

And for our customers, that safety in numbers and place in the Microsoft hierarchy of applications upon which you run your business might be the very best news of all!  It all starts happening in December.  Are you ready?

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Eric Wauters is a most knowledgeable and well-known blogger about Microsoft Dynamics best-selling ERP system, Dynamics NAV.  Wauters recently put together a great list of the key highlights (his ‘Facts’) gleaned from recent conferences and conversations regarding the upcoming release of the newest NAV version, 2018.  While we’ve written a bit about NAV 2019 (codename ‘Tenerife’) here recently, we felt his list of news & updates was the most definitive yet.

Since there’s too much to push into a single post, we’ll edit for length and publish Wauters’ facts in our own blog here as two posts, today and in the post following.  For the original article, go here.

 

Fact 1: the market around the product we know as “Dynamics NAV” keeps being a partner model.  NAV is Microsoft’s biggest ERP cash generator, and partners have been selling, implementing, customizing and supporting the product successfully for years, making or exceeding Microsoft’s goals for the product.  In the future, that won’t change, nor does anyone want it to do.  Now, on to the NAV product itself…

Fact 2: NAV will be available in the cloud.  In Spring 2018, there is going to be Microsoft Dynamics 365 in the cloud, based on NAV.  And that’s important to those, like us, who serve the SMB (small to midsize business) market exclusively.

Fact 3: There is a roadmap beyond Spring 2018.  Because NAV is now developed in what’s known as an ‘agile’ development environment (i.e., quick, incremental releases keeping the product fresh and up-to-date), it’s impossible to guarantee a future road map.  But they do a pretty good job nonetheless.  Dynamics 365 for Financial and Operations and 365 ‘Tenerife’ (a temporary name until the actual product is released) are the currently slated releases for late this year and early next year, and they are right on track.  The future NAV – available either on-premise or in the cloud – will follow this same roadmap.

Fact 4: On Premise is there to stay.  As long as there is business for On Premise, we will be able to do it with NAV. Microsoft’s focus is “cloud” for sure, but On Premise is there to stay.

Fact 5: Dynamics 365 will have full NAV capabilities.  Says Wauters:  “Rest assured – for whatever we will do in the cloud – we can do all! From Manufacturing to Jobs to Relationship Management to… Whatever! All a SMB wants to do – it will be there! With the power of the cloud!”

Fact 6: One Codebase.  We will have a slightly different experience in the cloud, but all will be one codebase.  Basically the design is somewhat different in Dynamics 365 (let’s call it the “Dynamics 365 Experience”), and a lot is “tuned” with Application Areas, but for all we do, the codebase is the same.

Fact 7: Extensibility with Extensions.  NAV has an extensibility model, aka “Extensions” or “Apps.”  This allows developers to create apps for Dynamics 365 and extensions for on-prem installations.  These can be built on customized databases, ensuring modifications unique to a client can be enabled.

And that’s only the half of it!  We’ll reveal the rest of Wauters’ thoughts – including the timing of the NAV 2018 release date – in our next post, so stay tuned…

 

 

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Today we’ll feature some of the updates and new views we saw at the recent annual NAV Directions conference in Orlando.  We’re sharing these with our own clients, but it only seemed right to share what’s new from NAV with our larger audience of blog readers as well.  So here goes…

We recently returned from the Microsoft Dynamics NAV annual conference and  we’re pleased to share what we learned there.  We gained insight as to the road ahead for NAV, and saw a number of the fast-growing family of third-party applications many companies are using to enhance NAV’s underlying capabilities.  We thought we’d share a few of those with you here today…

  • Microsoft announced that the forthcoming 2018 product – code named ‘Tenerife’ – would be “the single NAV product, with full NAV functionality, for both cloud and on-premise” going forward. That’s important, because Microsoft is making a push into the cloud like never before, and it’s good to know that the Dynamics NAV product is one they’ve chosen to be fully present in both forms: hosted on someone else’s server (in the cloud) or on your own (on-premise) for the foreseeable future.
  • While past NAV upgrades From Microsoft have recently been scheduled annually in October, this year’s date has not yet been announced. We’ll keep you posted.
  • NAV will continue to be customizable to the way you work – another important consideration. Long true of on-premise versions, it’s now slated to be true in the cloud via ‘extensions.’
  • ‘Tenerife’ (or NAV 2018) will mark a new stage in the interplay between Office 365 and Dynamics 365 (the current cloud product), specifically around Outlook and the Office 365 Business Center, a collection of apps based on NAV.

Among recently announced enhancements from our favorite 3rd party providers…

  • Warehouse Insight: Mobile warehouse data collection using handhelds in the warehouse to pick, pack & ship… Get real-time access to NAV inventory & production… Perform all those inventory and warehouse functions from hand-held devices… Capture lot & serial
  • Advanced inventory counting now simplifies inventory and cycle count entry, reconciliation, posting and analysis.
  • Integrated shipping with all major carriers including FedEx and UPS with real-time, detailed package management.
  • NAV Sales Configurator: Accurately quote your products with multiple configuration options that allow for assemble-to-order configurations directly from quotes and orders, or create production BOMs for more complex production environments.
  • Additionally: Production scheduling solutions from Insight Works and others… advanced document management and new expense reporting from ZetaDocs… and more.

Dynamics NAV is Microsoft’s best-selling ERP system worldwide, by far, proudly serving over 120,000 companies today worldwide.  Knowing that it’s a platform well poised for the future both on-premise and in the cloud is a strong message going forward for all those users, and we’re glad to see the product continue to grow in both functionality and users, worldwide.

 

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