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A good post by a west coast NAV blogger provides steps for integrating your Dynamics NAV (in this case, 2018, though it should work basically the same for other versions) with Microsoft’s Excel spreadsheet.  The end result is a new, separate “Dynamics NAV” tab in the ribbon of your Excel application that links directly to NAV.

[Disclaimer: While some users may be able to handle this one on their own, feel free to contact us or your authorized NAV partner to installation assistance if it will make you feel safer.  Also note that this is specifically for NAV (in particular, though not exclusively, the 2018 version), and presumably not for the new Business Central.]

Step 1: Locate your installation file (that’s your NAV ‘setup’ file). The file location may vary depending on how and where your NAV is installed (you might be able to get help from your IT folks, or call us).

Step2:  Double-click the file name (setup.exe) and when asked “Do you want to allow this app to make changes to your device?” click the “Yes” box.

Step 3: From the Maintenance setup wizard, click “Add or remove components” which will open a box listing a lot of application parts under the heading “Customize the Installation.”

Step 4: From the listing, click the down arrow in the little box associated with “Microsoft Excel Add-In.”

Step 5: When the little down-arrow box opens, click “Run from my computer” and then click “Next.”

Step 6: You will see a screen of specified parameters and, assuming these are correct, click “Apply.”

Step 7: NAV will then run the function to enable the add-in and you should see a Microsoft Dynamics NAV information screen that says: “The modification of Microsoft Dynamics NAV has completed successfully.”

 

Again, while it’s pretty simple, we always suggest you have a knowledgeable NAV/tech support person available to you whenever making changes to your system.  Assuming all goes well, you’ll end up with a Dynamics NAV tab in the ribbon of your Excel for fast NAV access!

Our thanks to Encore Business blogger Eunice Gan who posted this tip/article, with screen shots here, originally.

 

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In a recent article on MSDynamicsWorld entitled “What free access to the Dynamics Learning Portal means for Microsoft customers and partners,” we’ve learned of a significant change regarding the availability of the Dynamics Learning Portal: it’s now free!  That’s big news for NAV users (the fine print: yes, you must have a current support contract for your Dynamics product).

Formerly priced at $1,000 per year and available to resellers, it was still a most valuable and worthwhile resource for the money.  As Microsoft Dynamics NAV blogger and “MVP” Gus Gonzalez describes in a recent post:

A few years ago, Microsoft launched the Dynamics Learning Portal. The portal was an answer to all the requests from Microsoft Dynamics partners out there pleading for better training content and a better platform to consume that content. Up until then, partners were consuming content via PartnerSource, but the content was difficult to find and required organizations to give regular consultants access to lots of unrelated (and sometimes sensitive) information. So most partners were asking for a solution that would focus mainly on the readiness and training side of things.

The Partner Readiness team at Microsoft made a few decisions with the creation of the Dynamics Learning Portal. …the portal will focus on readiness, which means not just providing on-demand courses, but serving as central resource for accessing in-person training and other readiness related events.

Much of the content you’ll find at the Dynamics NAV portal was created by people outside of Microsoft, many of them members of the reseller and user communities, so much of it is focused on real-world application of the broad expanse of NAV functionality.

While the portal was never created as a money-maker, its value was significant, as is the fact that Microsoft is now making available for free.  The only catch is that users must be in good standing with a premier support contract.  (It’s also free for Microsoft certified partners.)

If you’re interested in more information (because, yes, there’s a little paperwork involved)… we ask that you contact your reseller directly.  We at PSSI will be happy to help.  Best bet is to email: Larry@pssiusa.com.  We’ll take it from there.

 

 

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Our headline is a tad misleading because, while the specifics concern Microsoft Dynamics NAV, one of the world’s leading ERP and business management software systems, the principles of the article could be applied to virtually any software system implementation.  This one just happened to be NAV, because that’s what the consultant, a London-based freelancer by the name of Hannes Holst, implemented when he wrote the article.  (it’s our firm’s specialty as well, by way of full disclosure.)

In that project, Holst was tasked with replacing an existing ERP system with Dynamics NAV, and the plan was to do it on time and on budget – or under.  And they succeeded.  The three critical factors, in Holst’s retrospective were…

  1. Know what the business wants. In our own process at our firm, we label this the business process analysis, but call it what you will, you have to scope the requirements.  It’s the roadmap for all that follows.  It’s a serious (and yes, billable) engagement requiring both parties’ key staff to engage deeply in thinking about the client’s company, processes and goals.  Then, a roadmap is constructed that involves what, where, when, how and who, and guides the entire project team so they understand the goals, benchmarks and processes of that implementation

 

  1. Utilize the Dynamics NAV standard. NAV has been developed continuously for well over twenty years now, and covers all the functionality most any business could need today.  Standardized functionality has been applied all up and down the accounting workflow in NAV, and it works across many industries.  (While we specialize here in manufacturing and distribution, it’s equally adept at retail, service and many others.)  So wherever possible, Holst advises, align the business processes with the software.  This makes projects simpler, quicker and more agile.  Users can start working in some areas very quickly, as other pieces get added later.  (There are some caveats in this regard, but the advice is generally true.)  Finally, assess customizations in terms of impact to the company, which includes an overarching need, the budget, the need to continually maintain those modifications into the future, and the value of their overall ROI.  And when you do customize, wait a while, and then prioritize those “mods” from high to low when you determine which are truly needed.

 

  1. Hire an internal NAV expert. You can’t always do this of course, but you can have your most knowledgeable expert on the company’s inner-workings coordinating the project on the client side with the project leader from the consultant’s side.  A lot of issues can be resolved quickly when you have process- and software-knowledgeable participants on both sides of that support call.  That internal resource at the client side has a lot to do with landing your project on-time and/or on-budget.  They can recognize problems early on, unsnag project logjams, warn of impending potential pitfalls, and keep client-side implementers on-task and moving forward.  Your whole implementation benefits from the insights an internal expert can bring to bear, and having voices on both sides of the project management spectrum helps ensure that projects are kept honest, flowing, cooperative and, ultimately, successful.

 

Holst’s full, brief article can be found here (you have to join the forum, but it’s free):

 

 

 

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Every NAV client we know (and every NON-NAV client too, for that matter) eventually confronts the need to adjust their costs.  A recent blog post by Alex Chow, of AP Commerce, a California (and Taiwan)-based NAV consultant provides a quick tip that NAV users should know.  While his advice won’t solve all costing issues, it provides an important foundation.

Chow points out that users occasionally need to use NAV’s “Adjust Cost-Item Entries” feature.  The problem is, when you do this, NAV also adjusts the entry date of that item, often causing an unwanted back-dating issue in a previous accounting period.

The reason, Chows notes, is that the adjust cost process will always adjust to the date of the original sales transaction (unless specified otherwise)

For example, if you haven’t run Adjust Cost in a while, and you then run it say in June, and there was a sale transaction in, say, March that has not been adjusted yet, the resulting entry will date itself to that of the June entry.  That’s a problem if you’ve already closed the books on March, as is likely.

However, as Chow points out, “this is where the Allow Posting From field from the General Ledger Setup screen comes to the rescue.”  If you set the “Allow Posting From” field on the General Ledger Setup to a different date (say for our example, June 1), any adjusted entries that are BEFORE the Allow Posting From date will have same posting date as the Allow Posting From field entry.

In our example above, it’s 6/30/18 and you run the adjust cost process. In addition, you set the Allow Posting From to 6/1/18. If there was a sales transaction that occurred on 3/15/18 that has not been adjusted yet, the resulting adjusting entry will be posted on 6/1/18.

Setting the Allow Posting From should be done after you close the month out, NOT before, notes Chow, adding that “I’ve seen situations where the user changed the Allow Posting From BEFORE the adjust cost was ran.  So all of the adjusting entries were posted in the current period instead of the period that they should’ve been in.”

The more you know…

 

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Microsoft Dynamics NAV has long been one of the world’s most popular, most implemented, best-selling ERP software programs for managing the small to midsize business.  Today, over 160,000 companies, deploy NAV across 2,700,000 users in 195 countries!  So when the core product evolves, the ensuing buzz cuts a wide swath across the IT community.  These days, a product long code-named ‘Tenerife’ is doing just that, as the quickly evolving SaaS (Software as a Service) next generation product begins its long journey as the future of NAV.

And as of yesterday (April 2, 2018) NAV is now (drum roll please…) Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central.

To begin with, what we’re seeing here is the evolution of NAV from an on-premise based software solution that’s been around for decades, that then evolved into a cloud-deployable solution (hosted by anyone from your local reseller to global partners who specialized in hosting), into the latest rendition, in which the CBFKAN (code base formerly known as NAV) evolves onto a Microsoft SaaS platform that is sold on a subscription basis (by “named user”) to users within a company for one flat monthly per-user cost.  (There will actually be three levels of pricing, dependent on the ‘type’ of user you choose to purchase.)

To reiterate, D365 Business Central is the complete installation of NAV software, that is, it’s the same code base.  That means that the functionality and flexibility and extensibility for which NAV has been long known are still there and fully functional.  NAV is a special, unique product, so that code base integrity is important.  But while the product itself remains intact, the ‘branding’ (and hence, name) is changing.

With D365 BC, there are some new wrinkles.  For one, it puts the individual users – the ‘clients’ – in a web-only situation.  These clients run on tablets and phones or in your computer’s web browser but, notably lacking at least at this point, is a traditional Windows client.  For existing NAV users, that might be a deal-breaker right there.  For the newer user starting fresh, perhaps not so much.

The software license is now provided via the Cloud Solution Provider program, a newer Microsoft delivery program in which providers must be registered.  It renders users as ‘named’ users (one client instance by individual name, generally) paid for via a monthly subscription-based fee.  There are no ‘concurrent’ users in the D365 BC/CSP model, but there are also no upfront software costs or what today is known as annual maintenance.  It’s all bundled into the one monthly fee.

D365 Business Central takes advantage of an app store philosophy embraced years ago by Apple and later others, in which applications are purchased through an online store.  With D365/BC, these apps add or extend the functionality of the base NAV product, and fit neatly into preassigned code areas within NAV for ‘plug-in’ flexibility and ease of installation.  In NAV, these are known as ‘extensions.’  The aim, at least for Microsoft, is to build a large and robust community of extension developers and users, thus growing the overall base of Dynamics 365 users.

There’s more to the announcement than will fit in a single post, so we’ll finish this post in a second installment in our next post.  Stay tuned…

 

 

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Our firm provides specialty software for the printing industry from a company called PrintVis.  Their print-industry specific solution consists of a wide range of added functionality that is baked into Microsoft  Dynamics NAV (as they say, “You can buy NAV without PrintVis, but you can’t buy PrintVis without NAV”).  That functionality has enabled them to automate close to 400 printing operations from the largest to the smallest, in dozens of countries around the world.  So we thought we’d take advantage of their expertise by sharing their recent post (#134 in a series…) on the NAV Change Log, courtesy of a consultant by the name of Doug Wiley, who wrote the post for them.  Excerpts follow…

In essence, the Change Log is exactly what it sounds like: a log of changes that are made in your database. Essentially, there are two types of “audit trails” in PrintVis: those that track transactional data (like inventory movements or changes to the G/L) and those that track changes to things like master records.

The first type is always on, and can’t be shut off. The second type is the Change Log, and that needs to be configured and turned on manually.

Turning it on is easy. You just search for “Change Log Setup” and open the window. There is a single check box which turns on the Change Log (in red).  The more complex setup is in the background, which can be reached by clicking “Tables” in the ribbon in the window above (in green). Here you will determine which tables, and which fields within those tables, you would like to track. You have the option to track “Insertion” (adding a record), “Modification” and “Deletion” by table.

Also notice for that each of these you have the option to turn it off “blank” (even if the change log itself is turned on), track all fields, track some fields, or to select the fields you’d like to track.

The interface to this functionality is relatively simple, but the way in which it’s configured is where the nuance and decision-making come in.  In the past, it was always recommended that the Change Log be used sparingly, to prevent the size of the database increasing too much when people altered records. Now that disk space has gotten more abundant, and cheaper, you can err more on the side of using it, but there is still a good reason to plan well: If you want to find who made a change, to what, and when, you will still need to sort through all of the changes that have been logged.

Fortunately, NAV has excellent filtering and sorting tools which will get you what you want – but still there’s no need to capture a bunch of changes which don’t really matter that much from an operational standpoint.  Picking which fields in which tables you’d like to track is step one of this process. For example, you probably want to know if a customer’s payment terms change, but not so much if their main contact phone number or email address does. You may want to track if someone changes your posting group setup (which drives all your accounting and financial reporting), but not if someone changes the name of a journal batch. Your consultant will help walk you through this process and give examples of best practices.

The next step is choosing when you want to track these changes. Obviously turning this on when setting up a new database would be madness, since every change made by every new record imported would generate an unnecessary entry. Generally, it’s recommended to only turn it on once final setups and master data have been approved and put into the database.

The third and final step is maintaining which changes are tracked. For example, if for some reason there needs to be a mass update to your cost centers, you probably want to turn this off while that happens to avoid generating a bunch of data (and remember to turn it back on!).

Our thanks to Doug Wiley for pointing out these Change Log tips, which we will hope will help our NAV users get even more out of this most powerful and robust ERP system.

 

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