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Posts Tagged ‘Preparing for ERP’

Any “digital transformation,” as the consultants at Panorama Consulting like to call things like ERP implementations, can seem daunting, a thing best put off ‘until tomorrow’ when, apparently, it will be… easier?  A recent article by Panorama makes a few points however that are worth noting, and that may get you off the starting line to your own internal project efforts and transformation.  We’ll meld their comments and our experience into today’s post.

For starters they point out, think about your ERP effort at a grass roots level.  You can start simply enough by having a few of your own people map out their current business processes, while thinking about the potential improvements they might want to see in a future state.  We always start our clients’ ERP projects with just such an effort.  Clients are usually too busy to do it for themselves, or perhaps too close to the subject to properly critique it, or lacking in the higher level business analysis skills that can help shape the best outcomes.  But at the very least, you can get your team thinking about how you do things today, and how you could better do them tomorrow, with less overlap and redundancy, and better information sharing and collaboration.

As you gather and review your grass roots analysis results, begin thinking about your overarching project goals.  Instead of starting with no sense of direction, think about the long-term goals business goals that underlie your IT, ERP or digital transformation project.  Be sure everyone understands the same goals, and how each of their individual parts in the process will contribute in the end to a more profitable, focused and leaner company.  Be careful not to get too distracted by the technology, and keep your purpose business-focused: that’s how you’ll succeed with customers and grow your own business.

Defining your business processes and requirements is the logical outcome of the actions and discussion we just noted.  It’s getting your ducks in a row.  It can take some time and outside help may be required (to learn what works and what doesn’t, best practices, etc.).  When you are ready to commence your actual ERP initiative, you’ll be equipped with the necessary data, thinking and step-outlines necessary to give your project its full forward momentum.

If you do all the above, you’ll be well prepared for the final step of hiring your outside consultant or reseller or implementer.  The process will go quicker and more smoothly if you’ve already given serious consideration to your business goals, your processes and workflows, and to your newly imagined future state.  It will help you more quickly and accurately match up process needs with software flows (and vice-versa), and save you time and money getting to the point where you’re ready to actually install and implement.

If it all sounds easy, well then, just remember that all along, your employees still have their regular jobs to do!  Be realistic in your expectations, fair in your judgments and remain focused on the planned business outcomes.  If you orient your resources consistently toward giving your people the tools they need and staying focused on the project’s business goals, you’ll fall into the small but highly desirable category of those who actually succeeded in their ERP implementations.

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